MOMOCHA KSHETRIMAYM

ORTHOTICS PROSTHETICS RESEARCH & REHABILITATION CENTER

  OPRRC

     Orthotics Prosthetics Research &

            Rehabilitation Center

 

 

 

Inversion & Eversion

 

     of Ankle Joint

 

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 Inversion  and  Eversion of Joints 

 


Jieani.gif - 122.8 K Inversion and eversion are movements of which the sole of the foot is made to face inwards and out wards respectively.

 

 


Muscles of inversion and eversion

Tibialis anterior and tibialis posterior are invertors.

Peroneus longus and peroneus brevis are evertors.

These 2 groups enter the foot from opposite sides. In each case, 

one muscle inserts into the medial side, the other into the lateral side.



Facets of sub-talar joint

The joints at which inversion and eversion primarily occur are:

  • the talo-calcaneo-navicular joint
  • the subtalar joint

These are synovial joints.



Talo-calcaneo-navicular joint The talocalcaneo-navicular joint is a small 'ball and socket' joint in 

which the ball is the head of the talus.
Socket of talo-calcaneo-navicular joint

The socket of the talocalcaneo-navicular joint is completed by a ligament. The plantar calcaneonavicular ligament or "spring" ligament is so called because it was erroneously believed that the talus bounced up and down on it putting "spring" into the step.

Adjacent parts of the two capsules are thickened to form an interosseous ligament. Part of this, attached to the neck of the talus, is called the cervical ligament.



Animation of the movement of the talo-calcaneo joint

The cervical ligament lies at the centre of the axis of rotation for inversion/eversion. The obliquity of the axis as it passes through the foot results in additional movement. for example, inversion is accompanied by plantar flexion. Since this frees the talus from the mortice of the ankle joint inversion is a free movement. By contrast, eversion is accompanied by dorsiflexion which locks the talus; hence eversion is relatively restricted. Angle of rotation for inversion/eversion

 

 



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